LBSCI 737 Week 2: What is Child? What is Childhood?

According to Access to Library Resources and Services for Minors: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights, “Libraries should not limit the selection and development of library resources simply because minors will have access to them. Institutional self-censorship diminishes the credibility of the library in the community and restricts access for all library users,” new librarians as well as librarians who have been one a long time, should always remember this. What surprises me is how often books get banned because it is inappropriate for minors or young adults and this, in turn, limits their selection and more. A child is in their learning stage as they grow older

A child is in their learning stage as they grow older which is what their childhood should be about. I was glad to see the “the right to be protected from harmful drugs and from the drug trade,” and “right to not be hurt or mistreated,” on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child in Child-friendly language because the world where a child doesn’t feel safe is a sad world. Although it is nice to see, the news paints a different picture that children are not being protected or safe with their parents. Maybe librarians can focus more on exploring these rights with them instead of banning books.

 

References:

Access to Library resources and services for Minors. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill/interpretations/access-library-resources-for-minors

 

UNICEF. (n.d.). UN Convention on the Rights of the Child In Child-Friendly Language [PDF file]. Retrieved from https://www.unicef.org/rightsite/files/uncrcchilldfriendlylanguage.pdf

 

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One thought on “LBSCI 737 Week 2: What is Child? What is Childhood?

  1. Marlene, your final sentence is powerful: “Although it is nice to see, the news paints a different picture that children are not being protected or safe with their parents. Maybe librarians can focus more on exploring these rights with them instead of banning books.” Book challenges seem to occur more often than they should, and I am often perplexed at what some parents deem “unsuitable” for their children. While I agree that parents have the authority to question and have a say in what their children read or watch, I agree with the ALA’s statement that, “Lack of access to information can be harmful to minors” as written in Access to Library Resources and Services for Minors: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights.

    We discussed in 739 that libraries serve as a safe place where children and young adults can find information or materials that they may not have access to otherwise. Issues or topics such as growing up, sexuality, bullying, and gender issues are difficult to talk to with other people, especially adults and parents. This is one of the ways that lack of access can be harmful to minors. Banning access to books and other important information prevents minors from gaining knowledge and thus being able to make informed choices which may impact their lives and consequently their place in society.

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